Thursday, October 14, 2010

The Day My Friend Died

It was a sunny day, not to be taken for granted in a place like Long Island, New York, in May 1988. My friend Celine was biking with a friend. She was training for a bike trip our youth group was planning, when she was struck by a car and killed. The driver was a classmate of hers, and since we went to different schools, I didn't know him. Celine always wore bowling shoes, and was outgoing, friendly and very religious. When, just days before the accident at a youth group meeting I didn't attend she announced "I'm not afraid to die. It could happen tomorrow and I'd be OK with that", her words seemed foreboding, and almost as if she'd beckoned death to her door.

When the accident was described in hushed whispers in the funeral home, she was said to have been biking in heavy traffic and there was just nowhere for the car to go but into her. I developed an irrational fear of biking, and of being fully satisfied with life, but I wasn't extremely close with Celine and life moved me forward from that day.


Half a Life

Last week I noticed an article about an author I'd read. He had a new book out, and I quickly clicked on the link, anticipating another historical fiction (a genre I love). As I read his interview I felt a falling sensation, like the world was shifting. Darin Strauss, author of Chang and Eng, a book I loved, wrote a memoir about killing Celine. Darin Strauss was the driver that day, and while I moved on from my friend's death Darin (and her family I'm sure) was left with the wreckage.

His book "Half a Life" begins with the accident, in which she inexplicably swerves into him and follows him through college and young adulthood where she haunts his conscience on a near daily basis. Learning more of her story (and his story) was a profound experience for me. As I read it I realized Celine did not beckon death to her door, she ran through that door on her own, and maybe bicycling is not as dangerous as I let myself believe.

4 comments:

Bill said...

This is an amazing story. The fact that you happened onto the book about this tragedy is uncanny. Destiny? Is there a message here? Thanks for sharing!

Bill:www.wildramblings.com

Confabulicious.com said...

That must have been tragic at the time. No one should have to see a good friend die.

Thanks for sharing.

Kim
www.confabulicious.com

Carolyn Watson-Dubisch said...

I contacted Darin Strauss and discussed my memories of Celine (and of the aftermath). It seemed to help him come to terms with this finally. I do hope so.

Introspective fefe said...

Thank you for sharing. I've always been interested in just hearing someone's story. I happened to chance upon your post after reading your comment on the only 1 star review of Half Life. I haven't yet read the book, but it's next on my list.

"People are willing to take these extraordinary chances to become writers, musicians, or painters, and because of them, we have a culture. If this ever stops, our culture will die, because most of our culture, in fact, has been created by people that got paid nothing for it--people like Edgar Allan Poe, Vincent Van Gogh or Mozart."-Kurt Vonnegut

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