Thursday, March 18, 2010

Preparations

I spent today working on this.....



Rev. James S. Watson, passed away on March 13, 2010, at Shea Hospital, in Phoenix, Arizona. He was a resident Phoenix for the last 13 years and a part-time resident of Waterville, Maine for 39 years. He died of pnemonia and was 71 years old.
Born in Louisville, Co. on January 14, 1939, James grew up in various coal mining towns in Colorado,New Mexico and Wyoming and attended the University of New Mexico. He also graduated from Union Seminary in New York City. He married Marjorie Norton-Taylor in 1966 and together they raised three children on Long Island, New York. He was a long time pastor of the Brentwood Presbyterian Church in New York and taught English at Brentwood High School. During this time they spent many seasons at their cottage on Salmon Lake in Maine.
In 1989 Marjorie died of cancer and James moved first to Amsterdam in Holland and eventually back to the west, to Arizona. Always spending his summers in Maine.
He is survived by his son, Duncan Watson and Kristin Watson, his daughter-in-law. His daughter Carolyn Watson-Dubisch and Michael Dubisch, his son-in-law, and his daughter, Mary Stubley and Benjamin Stubley, his son-in-law. By his grandchildren, Chloe, Phoebe and Naomi Dubisch, and Morgan and Thomas Stubley. Also by his sister, Janet Weber, and Laurence Weber, his brother-in-law.
There will be a memorial service on Sunday, March 21st at 12:30pm, at the First Congregational Church, 1407 North 2nd St., Phoenix, Arizona


It's very hard to sum up someone's life in a few paragraphs, especially when they've lived for 71 years. I also created a shorter version in case the newspapers need that. This photo is being printed poster sized and is being blown up from a wallet size (that shouldn't be a problem... right?).
We returned from his condo in Phoenix on Tuesday night, to see that my book has finally arrived! My new book is out .... I wish I could show it to my Dad.

Published by Abigail Books

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"People are willing to take these extraordinary chances to become writers, musicians, or painters, and because of them, we have a culture. If this ever stops, our culture will die, because most of our culture, in fact, has been created by people that got paid nothing for it--people like Edgar Allan Poe, Vincent Van Gogh or Mozart."-Kurt Vonnegut

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